Stop Secret Police Bill C-51

Stop Secret Police Bill C-51

against Bill C-51

The government is about to ram through a reckless, dangerous and ineffective "secret police" law called Bill C-51.

 

Tell the government to stop Bill C-51 before it's too late.

StopC51.ca is hosted by OpenMedia and Leadnow.ca - We will protect your privacy, and keep you informed about this campaign and others. You can find OpenMedia's privacy policy here and Leadnow.ca's privacy policy here.

 

 

We have to stop C-51 because it is:

1. Reckless: It turns CSIS into a ‘secret police’ force with little oversight or accountability.1

2. Dangerous: It opens the door for violations of our Charter Rights2 including censorship of free expression online.3

3. Ineffective: It will lead to dragnet surveillance and information sharing on innocent Canadians that even Stephen Harper has admitted is ineffective.4,5
 

*Add your voice before innocent Canadians are harmed.

 

If the bill passes, no less than 17 government agencies and even foreign governments will also have access to your sensitive private information.

We're talking about sensitive information that can reveal everything from your financial status, to your medical history, your sexual orientation, and even your religious and political beliefs.

 

On March 14th thousands joined the Day of Action to Defend Freedom and stop Secret Police Bill C-51

Here is just a snapshot of the events that took place in over 70 communities across Canada

 

Use this video produced by LeadNow to learn more and share it with your friends:

 


The StopC51.ca campaign is supported by:

 

  • Affinity Bridge
  • Agentic
  • Amnesty International Canada
  • BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association
  • BCGEU
  • Canadian Association of University Teachers
  • Canadian Access and Privacy Association (CAPA)
  • ​Canadian Journalists for Free Expression (CJFE)
  • Canadian Institute of Access and Privacy Professionals
  • Canadian Peace Alliance
    Council of Canadians
  • CWA Canada
  • Democracy Watch
  • Electronic Frontier Foundation
  • Free Dominion 
  • GenWhy Media
  • Groupe de recherche sur l’information et la surveillance au quotidien (GRISQ) / Université du Québec à Montréal
  • ​International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group
  • Leadnow
  • ​NewMode​
  • Ontario Federation of Labour
  • North American Association of Independent Journalists
  • OpenMedia
  • ​Privacy & Access Council of Canada
  • ​ProtestCanada
  •  Rocky Mountain Civil Liberties Association
  • ​Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy & Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC)
  • ​TunnelBear
  • ​Unifor
  • ​The Okanagan Directory
  • W.A.S.H (Women Against Steven Harper)
  •         Youth Vote Canada
  •  
  •  

*If you work with a group that would like to help Stop C-51 sign up HERE.

 

Footnotes:

[1] Parliament must reject Harper’s secret policeman bill. Source: The Globe and Mail.

[2] Bill C-51 threatens to sacrifice liberty for security. Source: Toronto Star.

[3] Bill C-51: Think Inside the Box. Source: The Canadian Constitution Foundation. Voices-Voix's study also notes that measures in C-51 could have "serious and far reaching effects that would curtail legitimate free expression" and that, "the threat disruption measures may violate Canadian law or the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms"

[4] “Total Information Awareness”: The Disastrous Privacy Consequences of Bill C-51. Source: Michael Geist.

[5] "We don't use metadata as a surveillance tool" - PM Harper. Source: YouTube. More than 100 academics also published an open letter to Members of Parliament noting that, "knowledgeable analysts have made cogent arguments not only that Bill C-51 may turn out to be ineffective in countering terrorism by virtue of what is omitted from the bill, but also that Bill C-51 could actually be counter-productive in that it could easily get in the way of effective policing, intelligence-gathering and prosecutorial activity."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Press: David Christopher | Cell: 1-778-232-1858 | Office: 1-604-633-2744 | david@openmedia.org